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Golf Instruction


Golf Instruction

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Golf Instruction


Golf Instruction

 

Teaching Philiosophy 

Michael started his career at a public golf course in Philadelphia giving lessons to juniors.   From 2009 - 2014, he taught golf at Temple University and gave over 800 golf lessons to college students.  During that time he experienced a great deal of golf and found ways to hone his skills at teaching by reading instructional books and attending seminars.  Today Michael is a PGA-Certified Teaching & Coaching instructor and strives to be the best golf instructor for his students.

Below is outline of Michael's core beliefs on style of teaching which has allowed his students to become better players.

  • The teacher-student relationship is the most important part of good golf instruction and positive learning environments.  Just like going on a first date, you have to take the time to get to know your student and make sure that you have some chemistry before going on to future lessons.

  • Each student should have goals that will set the pace for the lesson and future lessons.  Every student is different so goals should be tailored for each student. Goal-setting is the best way to measure a student’s progress and to determine next steps.

  • Golf can be played at almost any age and at any skill level.  Every golfer I have encountered has always asked me, “What is it that makes the game so hard?”  My answer is always the same - It’s only as hard as the golfer makes it to be.

  • Every golfer should have their own par for the course. Set a Par to the course based on your skill level and goals.  When I played in the PGA Playing Ability test I set par for the course at 78 (6-over). I did this to relive pressure and make the game easier. When making your own par for the course will help you set more realistic goals and play the golf course to your ability. By practicing your own par, you will see that you will start to enjoy and play the game better.

 
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The Golf Swing


The Golf Swing

The Golf Swing


The Golf Swing

 

The golf swing is taught in many different styles. I am a firm believer that there is no one way to swing a golf club. As a good friend has taught me about teaching is; take what the student does naturally and make it better. It is my job as a golf instructor to be educated on every different teaching style to be able to better help students’ natural tendencies. We all have our own individual swings and all learn at different paces.

I believe 70% of all mistakes made in the golf swing start with the set-up (Pre-Swing Fundamentals) -- Grip, Aim and Posture:

Grip

The position and pressure of the hands influence the position of the arms and shoulders at address and during the swing. Grip pressure, should always be the same; hold the club as if you would hold a baby, light to firm. Different body types will require different hand positions on a grip; the grip should never be to open faced or closed faced, neutral is ideal.

 
From left to right: Ten Finger Grip, Overlap Grip, Interlocking Grip

From left to right: Ten Finger Grip, Overlap Grip, Interlocking Grip

 

Aim

Aim is very important as it is the direction you want the ball to go in. You always want to aim your clubface to your intended target.  Do NOT aim your feet to the target.  Your feet are always parallel to your target.

 
For best aim, the Body Line is always parellel to the Target Line.

For best aim, the Body Line is always parellel to the Target Line.

 

Posture

Posture is the determining factor to how we move our body around our spine. A good posture will help produce the maximum amount of power a golfer can generate. Good posture means being in an athletic position (ready position), knees slightly bent, spine tilt from the waist (chest pointing 12 inches past the ball) and arms hanging straight down (relaxed). I always reference posture to the ready position of a linebacker or the position the shortstop is in while waiting for a pitch to be thrown.

You don’t have to be at a golf course to practice your Pre-Swing fundamentals. I make sure I always have a golf club at home and will grip it while I watch TV or waiting for dinner to cook in the oven. Whenever I see a mirror I stop and get in my golf set-up to make sure I am in the proper positions. Find ways to practice even when you’re not at the course and you will find yourself playing better golf before you know it.